Yale-Edinburgh 2020 and 2021

You will not be surprised that we are canceling this year’s Yale-Edinburgh conference. Whilst some countries are emerging from the COVID-19 pandemic, others are only entering it. Travel restrictions are likely to be in place for sometime. We are very sorry that we won’t be welcoming participants to Edinburgh this year. We had a large number of fascinating abstracts.

Those who have booked for the conference and accommodation will have their money reimbursed. This may take a week or two to reach your bank accounts, so please bear with the adminstrator, Mrs Jean Reynolds, as she deals with this. Please be in touch with cswc-events@ed.ac.uk if you have any practical difficulties. 

At this stage we would already like to invite you to Yale-Edinburgh 2021! We very much hope that it will be possible to hold the conference at the end of June next year. We propose to have the same theme ‘Oral, Print and Digital Cultures‘ and we will hold it in Edinburgh. It remains particularly topical as there has been an increased move to digital forms of Christian worship during the spread of COVID-19. This move remains uneven and dynamic. We will not keep the 2020 abstracts. You may like to submit the same one next year or write a new one.

We will write again towards the end of the year with dates and more information.

In the meantime, we send our prayers for your good health.

Alexander Chow and Emma Wild-Wood

Studies in World Christianity, Issue 26.1

Diversity and Difference

It perhaps goes without saying that World Christianity is diverse. In large part, this diversity comes from the multiplicity of cultural, religious and socio-political concerns of the majority world, which have raised new questions to pre-existing theologies and practices. Such differences exist not only between North and South, East and West, but also within the same locale – across the progress of time and diversity in visions of mission. Furthermore, these differences have often manifested themselves institutionally, through the proliferation of new church movements, often formed independent of established denominational structures.

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Yale-Edinburgh 2020 – Call for Papers

Oral, Print, and Digital Cultures in World Christianity and the History of Mission
New College, University of Edinburgh, 25–27 June 2020
Proposals due: March 6, 2020
Registration deadline: March 30, 2020

The next meeting of the Yale-Edinburgh Group on World Christianity and the History of Mission will take place in New College, University of Edinburgh, from 25–27 June 2020. The theme will be Oral, Print, and Digital Cultures in World Christianity and the History of Mission

Studies in world Christianity and the history of mission have not been afraid to engage the topic of culture. However, they have mostly referred to the encounters of Western Christian cultures with another, whether that be Confucian and Hindu culture, or the indigenous cultures of the Americas, Africa, and Oceania. This year’s theme uses the language of culture to speak about three different mediums in which the Christian message is communicated and the Christian life is practiced. These cultures have developed somewhat chronologically, but they also simultaneously coexist in the contemporary world. 

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Studies in World Christianity, Issue 25.2

Scripture, prayer and worship are three key elements of the internal life of Christians across the world. Corporately or individually, Christians hear, read, enact and inhabit the bible. They pray alone, in twos and threes, and in large gatherings. They pray aloud or in silence. They pray spontaneously or following a common form of words. Christians sing songs and make music. They perform and recite liturgies. Such is the ubiquity of these elements that it seems surprising that it was not until 2018 that the Yale-Edinburgh Conference chose ‘Scripture, Prayer and Worship in the History of Missions and World Christianity’ as its theme. This special issue of Studies in World Christianity brings together six of the excellent papers that were presented at the conference. Together they offer a time frame of about two hundred years and an impressive global range – New Zealand, Argentina, India, USA and China. Although they only focus upon Protestant practice, the articles demonstrate how rich that practice has become.

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