About Emma Wild-Wood

Dr Emma Wild-Wood completed her PhD in the Centre for the Study of World Christianity at the University of Edinburgh under Dr Jack Thompson. She taught in Bunia in DR Congo and in Uganda for a number of years. Before coming back to Edinburgh, Emma was the Director of the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide and Lecturer in World Christianities in the Faculty of Divinity of the University of Cambridge.

New Appointment: Dr Pedro Feitoza

Dr Pedro Feitoza

The Centre for the Study of World Christianity is delighted to announce the appointment of Dr Pedro Feitoza as Lecturer in Latin American Christianity, from September 2022.

Pedro is from Brazil and currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Brazilian Centre of Analysis and Planning (CEBRAP) in São Paulo. He completed his PhD, ‘Protestants and the public sphere in Brazil, c.1870-c.1930’ in 2019 from the University of Cambridge. A monograph from the thesis will be available shortly.

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Faith, Healing, and Medicine in the time of COVID-19

Centre Co-director Dr Emma Wild-Wood has been collaborating with researchers in DR Congo to understand how faith communities there have been impacted by COVID-19. Here is some material developed for UK secondary schools to show how religious studies can help global health studies.

The Mission of Apolo Kivebulaya

Despite lockdown my monograph is out now (international hardback and e-version), and will appear in East Africa next month with Twaweza press. Here’s some thoughts on its process and aims.

I was formally introduced to Apolo Kivebulaya in December 1993 – at his grave outside the Anglican Cathedral in Boga, Zaire. After contemplating the simple metal cross with stone plinth and the graves of other church leaders beside it, I was taken to meet one of his adopted children. We walked past the hospital and the schools which Apolo had instigated, to the house of Yoweri Rwakaikara, now an elderly man. Rwakaikara regaled me with stories of Apolo’s personal charisma and their journeys together during the 1920s as if they had happened the previous day.

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