In Memory of Dr T. Jack Thompson

Professor Brian Stanley remembers Dr T. Jack Thompson (1943–2017), former director of the Centre for the Study of Christianity in the Non-Western World

It is with great sadness that the School announces the death on 10 August 2017 of Dr T. Jack Thompson. Jack came to New College as Lecturer in Mission Studies in 1993 from the Selly Oak Colleges in Birmingham.  He remained on the staff until December 2008, becoming Senior Lecturer in African Christianity. He served as Director of the Centre for the Study of Christianity in the Non-Western World (now the Centre for the Study of World Christianity) from 2005 to 2008, and fulfilled a number of key roles in the School, including that of Director of Postgraduate Studies. He was a devoted supervisor of many PhD students in world Christianity. Continue reading

James Legge Conference, June 2015 – Call for Papers

James Legge

James Legge and Scottish Missions to China
University of Edinburgh, 11–13 June 2015
Deadline for proposals: 31 March 2015 17 April 2015

Inside and outside of China, there is a growing scholarly debate around how foreigners have contributed to and, at times, maligned prevailing understandings of Chinese philosophy, religion, and culture. One of the most important figures in these discussions is James Legge, the Scottish missionary-scholar to China, and translator of Chinese writings into English and Christian writings into Chinese. As 2015 will be the bicentennial of Legge’s birth, the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for the Study of World Christianity, in collaboration with the Scottish Centre for Chinese Studies, plans to hold an international and interdisciplinary conference to be held on 11–13 June 2015 at the University of Edinburgh, where Legge received an honorary doctorate (LLD) in 1884.

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Studies in World Christianity, Issue 20.2

Polarities and Parallels

Studies in World ChristianityThe four articles in this issue of Studies in World Christianity span four separate geographical locations: India, China, Kenya and (unusually for this journal) Scotland. Their subject matter also ranges widely, from some of the theological issues raised by the Christian encounter with other religions to an exploration of the challenges presented to the churches by the ever-increasing influx of rural populations into urban environments – a narrative first played out in nineteenth-century Europe and then multiply rehearsed on African, Asian, Australasian or Latin American stages from the twentieth century until today. The four articles present us with a series of polarities and parallels that deserve careful reflection. Continue reading